sagansense:

How do you know what you’re seeing is real? The science behind these amazing illusions may shake your faith in ‘reality’.

via ASAPscience

shertockhotmes:

theonlymack99:

thatscienceguy:

Proof of the Pythagoras Theorem.

My math teacher showed us this in 8th grade and I thought I’d seen god

shit math guys. never thought any would make it to my blog
but thIS 

shertockhotmes:

theonlymack99:

thatscienceguy:

Proof of the Pythagoras Theorem.

My math teacher showed us this in 8th grade and I thought I’d seen god

shit math guys. never thought any would make it to my blog

but thIS 

humanrightswatch:

newshour:

The United Nations estimates that since 2011, more than 100,000 people have been killed in the Syrian conflict. Violence has forced more than 2 million Syrians to flee the country as refugees, and another 4.5 million are internally displaced. 
Roughly one in four Syrians have been forced to abandon their home. 

And to think that this is only the recorded number of refugees.

humanrightswatch:

newshour:

The United Nations estimates that since 2011, more than 100,000 people have been killed in the Syrian conflict. Violence has forced more than 2 million Syrians to flee the country as refugees, and another 4.5 million are internally displaced.

Roughly one in four Syrians have been forced to abandon their home. 

And to think that this is only the recorded number of refugees.

cheatsheet:

crookedindifference:

@NASA now on Instagram

Beyond brunch.  

cheatsheet:

crookedindifference:

@NASA now on Instagram

Beyond brunch.  

Most people say there’s clear evidence the Syrian government used chemical weapons. What Americans aren’t persuaded of is that the costs and risks of this outweigh the benefits and upsides. They are not persuaded that getting involved militarily is going to really solve the problem and reduce the use of chemical weapons.

Michael Dimock, Director, Pew Research Center for the People & the Press (on NPR Morning Edition)

See our latest national poll on Syria here.

(via pewresearch)

theatlantic:

Why is Starbucks So Expensive in China?

Imagine walking into Starbucks and discovering that your grande latte cost $27. You’d probably think that the world’s coffee supply had suddenly vanished. Or that you’d traveled by time machine many decades into the future.
These inflated prices gives you a pretty good idea of the relative cost (adjusted to per capita income) of what a Chinese person pays for the drink. China’s per capita income, at about $7,200, is around five and a half times less than the American figure. Yet at a Starbucks in Beijing, a grande latte goes for about $4.80—or a dollar more than what it costs in the United States. A simple beverage of espresso and steamed milk is pretty damned expensive in China.
Read more. [Image: Jason Lee/Reuters]

theatlantic:

Why is Starbucks So Expensive in China?

Imagine walking into Starbucks and discovering that your grande latte cost $27. You’d probably think that the world’s coffee supply had suddenly vanished. Or that you’d traveled by time machine many decades into the future.

These inflated prices gives you a pretty good idea of the relative cost (adjusted to per capita income) of what a Chinese person pays for the drink. China’s per capita income, at about $7,200, is around five and a half times less than the American figure. Yet at a Starbucks in Beijing, a grande latte goes for about $4.80—or a dollar more than what it costs in the United States. A simple beverage of espresso and steamed milk is pretty damned expensive in China.

Read more. [Image: Jason Lee/Reuters]

scienceisbeauty:

Mr Feynman’s always funny:

The Feynman point is a sequence of six 9s that begins at the 762nd decimal place of the decimal representation of π. It is named after physicist Richard Feynman, who once stated during a lecture he would like to memorize the digits of π until that point, so he could recite them and quip “nine nine nine nine nine nine and so on”, suggesting, in a tongue-in-cheek manner, that π is rational.

-

scienceisbeauty:

Mr Feynman’s always funny:

The Feynman point is a sequence of six 9s that begins at the 762nd decimal place of the decimal representation of π. It is named after physicist Richard Feynman, who once stated during a lecture he would like to memorize the digits of π until that point, so he could recite them and quip “nine nine nine nine nine nine and so on”, suggesting, in a tongue-in-cheek manner, that π is rational.

-

sagansense:

On July 8, 2011 the Space Shuttle Atlantis is launched in the final mission of the Shuttle program, STS-135.
Atlantis is seen in this photo on August 2, 1991 at the launch of a nine day mission.

via todaysdocument

RIP Atlantis.

sagansense:

On July 8, 2011 the Space Shuttle Atlantis is launched in the final mission of the Shuttle program, STS-135.

Atlantis is seen in this photo on August 2, 1991 at the launch of a nine day mission.

via todaysdocument

RIP Atlantis.

Humans have an amazing capacity for self-deception. Perhaps it evolved to allow ourselves to live with our own contradictions - our faults. An ego preserver, a ward against paralyzing depression and self-doubt. But Feynman, as almost always happens, is right. Self-deception can be a limiting factor to growth. Doubt creates questions and questioning spurs creation. Sometimes it’s better to risk stability for truth.

Humans have an amazing capacity for self-deception. Perhaps it evolved to allow ourselves to live with our own contradictions - our faults. An ego preserver, a ward against paralyzing depression and self-doubt. But Feynman, as almost always happens, is right. Self-deception can be a limiting factor to growth. Doubt creates questions and questioning spurs creation. Sometimes it’s better to risk stability for truth.

findchaos:

(Just a Few of) The Federal Benefits of Marriage Equality

What we didn’t have yesterday.

thisistheverge:

Garmin’s portable HUD puts your navigation on any car’s windshield
Garmin has officially announced the HUD, a portable heads-up display unit for vehicles that can receive navigation instructions from a smartphone and display them on any car’s windshield. Paired with a transparent film that sticks to the window or a dedicated reflector lens, the HUD is designed to make sure drivers keep their eyes on the road instead of looking at various screens for navigation purposes. 

It’s finally here! I have needed this for the past 5 years.

thisistheverge:

Garmin’s portable HUD puts your navigation on any car’s windshield

Garmin has officially announced the HUD, a portable heads-up display unit for vehicles that can receive navigation instructions from a smartphone and display them on any car’s windshield. Paired with a transparent film that sticks to the window or a dedicated reflector lens, the HUD is designed to make sure drivers keep their eyes on the road instead of looking at various screens for navigation purposes. 

It’s finally here! I have needed this for the past 5 years.